Home Squat Home at Access Gallery

Art Action Earwig is exhibiting a tent and projection installation of an except of Home Squat Home as part of Conditional Belonging, a group show curated by Rebecca Wang, showing until September 18 at the Access Gallery: 222 E. Georgia Street / Tuesday to Saturday 12 to 5pm.

Zine Campaign:

20%, $2, from each HsH zine sale, both at Access Gallery and online, will go to aid displaced and houseless people in the DTES. Campaign runs until September 18.

A green tent with a light grey cover is set on a wood planked floor in a white walled gallery space. Behind the tent a projection on the wall shows a shadow puppet tent, two fingers in shoes and green grass. Captions at the bottom center of the projection read “We erected our tent beside the Han river.” Beside the projection a plinth holds several Home Squat Home zines. In the foreground two black headphone sets hand on the wall. A banner on the tent reads in both English and Korean “Home Squat Home mobile app” at the top left and “art action earwig” at the top right. A large QR code occupies the center of the banner. The words “To download the free app scan me” are on the right side of the QR code along with the app Icon, an abstract black earwig in front of an orange tent, with a purple ground and green sky. The words “Light and shadow story-teller squatting on your phone for 49 days” are found at the bottom center above funder logos.
A green tent with a light grey cover is set on a wood planked floor in a white walled gallery space. Behind the tent a projection on the wall shows a shadow puppet tent, two fingers in shoes and green grass. Captions at the bottom center of the projection read “We erected our tent beside the Han river.” Beside the projection a plinth holds several Home Squat Home zines. In the foreground two black headphone sets hand on the wall. A banner on the tent reads in both English and Korean “Home Squat Home mobile app” at the top left and “art action earwig” at the top right. A large QR code occupies the center of the banner. The words “To download the free app scan me” are on the right side of the QR code along with the app Icon, an abstract black earwig in front of an orange tent, with a purple ground and green sky. The words “Light and shadow story-teller squatting on your phone for 49 days” are found at the bottom center above funder logos.
A green tent with a light grey cover is set on a wood planked floor in a white walled gallery space. Behind the tent a projection on the wall is dark. Captions at the bottom center of the projection read “(Children playing).” Beside the projection a plinth holds several Home Squat Home zines. On another wall to the right the projection and plinth, three photographs by photographer Neena Robertson hang. Each photograph depicts a person’s body entangled with the branches of trees in a twisted leafless grove. Patches of soil alternate with patches of vibrant green bush. The photography series, Hide and Seek, was created at a former camping site of unhoused residents on the unceded traditional territory of the lək̓ʷəŋən peoples on the Esquimalt and Songhees Nations (known as Victoria BC). A banner on the tent reads in both English and Korean “Home Squat Home mobile app” at the top left and “art action earwig” at the top right. A large QR code occupies the center of the banner. The words “To download the free app scan me” are on the right side of the QR code along with the app Icon, an abstract black earwig in front of an orange tent, with a purple ground and green sky. The words “Light and shadow story-teller squatting on your phone for 49 days” are found at the bottom center above funder logos.
A green tent with a light grey cover is set on a wood planked floor in a white walled gallery space. Behind the tent a projection on the wall is dark. Captions at the bottom center of the projection read “(Children playing).” Beside the projection a plinth holds several Home Squat Home zines. On another wall to the right the projection and plinth, three photographs by photographer Neena Robertson hang. Each photograph depicts a person’s body entangled with the branches of trees in a twisted leafless grove. Patches of soil alternate with patches of vibrant green bush. The photography series, Hide and Seek, was created at a former camping site of unhoused residents on the unceded traditional territory of the lək̓ʷəŋən peoples on the Esquimalt and Songhees Nations (known as Victoria BC). A banner on the tent reads in both English and Korean “Home Squat Home mobile app” at the top left and “art action earwig” at the top right. A large QR code occupies the center of the banner. The words “To download the free app scan me” are on the right side of the QR code along with the app Icon, an abstract black earwig in front of an orange tent, with a purple ground and green sky. The words “Light and shadow story-teller squatting on your phone for 49 days” are found at the bottom center above funder logos.
A projection on the wall shows the profile of a shadow puppet head, resting on the ground surrounded by green grass. An earwig crawls on the head. The eye is visible as a double slit, letting light through, and through the ear we see green grass. Captions at the bottom center of the projection read “hearing the lullaby.” Beside the projection a plinth holds several Home Squat Home zines.
A projection on the wall shows the profile of a shadow puppet head, resting on the ground surrounded by green grass. An earwig crawls on the head. The eye is visible as a double slit, letting light through, and through the ear we see green grass. Captions at the bottom center of the projection read “hearing the lullaby.” Beside the projection a plinth holds several Home Squat Home zines.
Home Squat Home Excerpt. Simplified Chinese Subtitles

Simplified Chinese Translation by Yilin Wang, with support from The Access Gallery.

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